Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
1
Swarm Season!
Swarm Season!
Apr 1 – Jul 15 all-day
https://nocobees.org/swarm/  
What to do? June
What to do? June
Jun 1 all-day
Bees should still be working hard filling up honey supers as the flows continue. Your hive could still swarm in June, so keep your swarm management or be prepared with extra hive bodies to place[...]
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
National Pollinator Week!
National Pollinator Week!
Jun 16 – Jun 23 all-day
https://www.pollinator.org/pollinator-week  
17
18
19
20
June Meeting – The Ranch 6:00 pm
June Meeting – The Ranch
Jun 20 @ 6:00 pm – 8:30 pm
Honey Tasting  – County Fair Honey Judging – with Lisa Boesen Learn what you need to know so that you can enter your honey at the county fair for judging. Lisa has been a beekeeper[...]
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Jun
16
Sun
2024
National Pollinator Week!
Jun 16 – Jun 23 all-day

https://www.pollinator.org/pollinator-week

 

Jun
20
Thu
2024
June Meeting – The Ranch
Jun 20 @ 6:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Honey Tasting  – County Fair Honey Judging – with Lisa Boesen

Learn what you need to know so that you can enter your honey at the county fair for judging.

Lisa has been a beekeeper for six years and is currently past president of the Northern Colorado Beekeepers Association. While still learning the advanced art and science of beekeeping, she enjoys volunteering her background in nonprofit Organizational Leadership to help clubs and collaborate with other groups to support the overall pollinator network. 

Ways to Process Honey Products – with Sarah Blackmer

so you have made your harvest and you have all this honey and wax. now what?

Jul
1
Mon
2024
What to do? July
Jul 1 all-day

The nectar flow has or will be coming to an end. Your bees will search for nectar as best they can. They are beginning to prepare for the winter and get as much stored up as possible.

As the beekeeper, you will be harvesting soon. some may want to test and treat for mites this month. Not a great idea if you have honey supers on as you don’t want to contaminate your supers with any chemicals.  It would be best to first harvest your honey and then treat for mites either chemically or with powdered sugar.  If you are finding that the bees are not storing honey in your upper supers, you may be honey bound. Move the middle frames of honey UP to the next super replacing the lower ones with empty frames to encourage them to move up and fill more supers.

 

Jul
18
Thu
2024
July Meeting – Farming in Midevil Europe & honeybee healthcare – Nicole Archambeau
Jul 18 @ 6:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Speaker – Nicole Archambeau

Associate Professor of History

Colorado State Univesity

She is working on a project at CSU looking at farming in midevil Europe. The project focuses on honeybee healthcare.

https://www.libarts.colostate.edu/people/nambeau/

 

meeting at The Ranch – Larimer County Fairgrounds

Aug
1
Thu
2024
Extractor Use
Aug 1 – Sep 30 all-day
What to do? August
Aug 1 all-day

August is pretty much like July. Nectar supplies are becoming harder to find. Good plants to have planted in your bee yard would be Golden Rod and Aster plants. They are great sources of late summer nectar.

As the beekeeper, Take off your supers, it’s time to harvest. Maybe consider leaving one honey super on the hive for your bees. Do you really need all the honey? it will give them extra stores for the winter and also help eliminate any ’emergency winter feedings’.  Some beekeepers will even store full honey frames for either cut honeycomb or for feeding the hive in January by replacing empty honey frames with saved honey frames. it is best to feed your bees their own food.  Continue to monitor your hive for mites. you could treat after you have harvested your honey supers. How did your queen perform this summer?  This would be an opportunity to requeen if necessary.

 

Aug
15
Thu
2024
August Meeting – PICNIC – TBD Location –
Aug 15 @ 6:00 pm – 8:30 pm
Sep
1
Sun
2024
What to do? September
Sep 1 all-day

The hive is prepping for winter. Depending on how your summer is going. There are not many sources for nectar right now except for Golden Rod and Aster plants. Your queen will begin to lay fewer eggs and will be laying just enough for the winter workers.  You’ll begin to notice fewer drones and maybe even see them being evicted from the hive.

As the beekeeper, keep inspecting your hive. Be aware of cooler temperatures before opening your hive. Now would be a good time to determine the strength of your hive and evaluate its performance. Check for the queen. How is her laying pattern? Is the laying pattern solid and strong? Does the hive appear weak and have too few bees? You may want to combine with another hive in the same condition to create one stronger hive. Plan on feeding them through the winter if they appear weak and have limited stores at this time going into winter.  Remove all excess supers, and make the hive more compact. Install your entrance reducers and if mice are an issue, mouse guards.